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You need to see Mercury at its highest on Wednesday night

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Mercury swings from the east to the west of the Sun three times a year, and the greatest elongation of the planet takes place 22 days before and after Mercury and Earth are on the same side of the Sun.

CELESTIAL OBJECTS COME AND GO FROM OUR VIEW IN THE NIGHT SKY, as they fling by or orbit around the Sun. Whether it be the full moon or a meteor shower or just the best night to see Mars, we’re here to direct your eyes skyward and tell you to look up and appreciate the wonders of space from Earth.

This week, we’re asking you to marvel at the beauty of the planet Mercury as it reaches its longest elongation in the west on Wednesday, July 22 shortly after sunset, and will be visible to sky gazers through the night.

Mercury is the closest planet to the Sun, and its solar proximity makes it difficult to spot the smallest planet in the Solar System as it becomes obscured by the light of our common host star.

However, on Wednesday night, Mercury will reach its longest elongation, or its furthest position away from the Sun, therefore becoming at its highest point of visibility to us Earthlings.

Mercury swings from the east to the west of the Sun three times a year, and the greatest elongation of the planet takes place 22 days before and after Mercury and Earth are on the same side of the Sun. On July 22, Mercury will reach the greatest elongation to the west, at 20 degrees west of the Sun, .

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