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This sci-fi thriller is ‘Alien’ for a new generation

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The film mixes ingredients from Ridley Scott’s Alien, John Carpenter’s The Thing, Steven Spielberg’s Jurassic Park, and even Venom, but still tastes fresh in its gripping, original story that is just a little more thoughtful than it is terrifying.

Like the space race that ended with Americans on the Moon in 1969, Russian science fiction always finds itself compared to Yankee counterparts.

In 1972, Andrei Tarkovsky’s dark and dirty space epic Solaris poked fun at Stanley Kubrick’s sanitized vision of intergalactic travel in 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968). Fast forward to 2020, and there is Sputnik from director Egor Abramenko.

A new science fiction horror movie about a Cold War-era spacecraft that brings back something otherworldly, Sputnik is a Russian film that proudly wears American influences on its sleeve. The film mixes ingredients from Ridley Scott’s Alien, John Carpenter’s The Thing, Steven Spielberg’s Jurassic Park, and even Venom, but still tastes fresh in its gripping, original story that is just a little more thoughtful than it is terrifying.

In select theaters and VOD on August 14, Sputnik takes place at the tail end of the Cold War. It’s 1983 and a spacecraft containing three cosmonauts violently crashes back to Earth. The only survivor, Konstanin (Pyotr Fyodorov) doesn’t remember a thing. A disgraced doctor, Tatiana (Oksana Akinshina) is recruited to a secret facility to evaluate Konstanin. That’s when Tatiana discovers an alien parasite clinging to Konstanin as a host, and a true threat that awaits them all.

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