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Answered: Five of our biggest questions.

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So there was always a kind of Moses story for Clarke where she is not allowed to go to the promised land at the end of the story”, he thought it was a nice touch to have her friends choose to stay with her in this final scene rather than going to the sky in this little light bulb.

Warning: Spoilers follow for The CW’s “The 100” series finale.

On Wednesday night, “The 100” ended after seven seasons, but there’s still some debating to do about this emotionally emotional series finale.

All of our questions — we asked showrunner Jason Rothenberg who wrote and directed the last episode The Last War all the questions we still have — so no need to question. Our first one was a no-brainer…

Pourquoi was Clarke not allowed to transcend with all the others?

Rothenberg said that Clarke is the angel of death in the final chapter. As Lexa said in the very end to her: In the history of any species in the universe, no one committed murder during the test. So there was always a sort of Moses story for us with Clarke where she is not allowed to go to the promised land at the end of the story.”

He thought it was a nice touch to have her friends choose to stay with her in this final scene instead of going up into the sky in that little light bulb. He said they did not want her to be alone.

So now after all the people who have stayed with Clarke on Earth dies?

That essentially was the deal. You could possibly imagine a scene between them and some Light Stations one who told them what the rules were if they chose to stay. So to them, it is not mandatory that you leave this body, but if you choose not to do so, then you are opting not later to get a second chance at it when you die in real life. They therefore made a willing decision to stay together as a unit, as a family, and to keep Clarke company certainly.

And there could be no exception for Bellamy, who died earlier this season?

That was before transcendence and “only the living shall transcend” is what Cadogan wrote in [his book. As long as they kept on long enough to still draw breath at the moment of transcendence — whether even through CPR or pumped into their hearts — they would transcend them themselves. I always knew that this would happen, naturally. Emori did die physically, but her mind was still “live” in mind space, so she transcended

Transcendenz essentially another version of Heaven

Depending on religion a person could interpret the story in this way. As a show, we say that it is essentially a higher being joining the universal consciousness. That is the next level of human experience. It is a religious notion not necessarily. It is the next real-time step in human evolution.

What was the moral of the story in the end?

The moral of the story has been since the beginning that tribalism is bad. We won’t develop until we transcend our instincts to fight for our side or our party or our country or whatever. We won’t survive until we realise that we’re all in this together. On the battlefield that boiled down to in that moment when they dropped their weapons and chose to stop fighting. That was the key that openly opened transcendence for them.

(Tap photo and swipe to see gallery)

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